Meatless Monday: Collard Wraps

Collard Wraps

Put down that tortilla. Stash away that boring white bread. And bring out those summer greens to your kitchen counter. It’s time to reinvent your lunch, starting from the base level — the wrapper.

Late July calls for light fare that will cool you down, not weigh you down. It calls for meals you can easily pack up and head with to the park, and ones that are every bit as fresh as they make you feel. What’s our go-to for that? Meet the Collard Wrap.

Collard leaves provide the perfect green plate for packaging up your favorite flavorful ingredients. They’re sturdy, come at a 5-calorie-per-leaf price, and have way more vitamins and nutrients than your traditional wrapper can boast. They’re also our current topic of discussion for today’s Meatless Monday, and while we’ll relish them for dinner tonight, our minds are already traveling to this weekend with our cooler on the beach. We’ll have these waiting inside. Portable wraps are a meal made for traveling adventures, and these are adventurous as they come. (I.e., goodbye peanut butter and jelly. We appreciate your willingness to travel, but you are simply no fun. Nor do you make us feel fresh on the beach.)

Collard Leaf

 

So as you plan out your next traveling trip, picnic, or simply tomorrow’s workday lunch, consider trying something new and calling on the collard leaf. It’ll provide the platform for a fun and healthful lunch, in which you can really roll up any of your favorite savory sandwich materials. Just make sure to include a little healthy fat, such as avocado or olive oil, to loosen up those leaves, and pull all the flavors together. Our food blogging LifeVester, Grace, brings us a roundup of unique ideas to get you started in the event you’d like to extend beyond your standard sandwich fare.

Click here for recipes…


Lucky Foods for Friday the 13th

Paraskevidekatriaphobia.

Try saying that five times fast. Or once, for that matter. (We dare you.)

We can’t tell you how to pronounce that word, but we can tell you it means “the fear of Friday the 13th”. For those with symptoms, we’ve got some solutions for all those superstitious jitters – edible ones that’ll enhance your health, whether you think you need them or not.

Foods for good luck (and good health):

Garlic
Garlic
  • Its lucky legend: From warding off vampires to preventing affects that come from someone giving you the evil eye (so say the Ancient Greeks), this pungent bulb reeks of luck.
  • Why you should really eat it: The same chemical that makes garlic smell, allicin, is a naturally occurring antioxidant that may help improve heart health. Evidence shows garlic may lower blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol levels, and numerous studies indicate the cloves have anti-cancerous effects.

(Whole Grain) Rice

onigiri-1

  • Its lucky legend: The throwing of rice at weddings is said to bring prosperity, wealth and happiness to happy couples.
  • Why you should really eat it: Whole grain rice (brown/wild/etc.) is packed with fiber, minerals and phytonutrients. White rice, however, is not, since its nutrient-rich germ and bran are removed in processing. Eating 2 or more servings of brown rice a week can help reduce your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes by about 10%. Those who eat white rice on a regular basis are almost 20% more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes.

Black-eyed Peas

Black eyed peas

  • Its lucky legend: “Hoppin John”, a Southern dish featuring black-eyed peas is said to bring good luck and prosperity when eaten each New Year.
  • Why you should really eat it: These guys are loaded with vitamins and minerals, like over 50% DV (daily value) of potassium, crucial for heart and cell function. The beans also have a whopping 11 grams of fiber per cup, which helps lower blood cholesterol and glucose levels.

Food52’s looking out for us today. They’ve got a recipe that combines all three of the ingredients listed above, packaged into one wholesome meal we want on our prosperity plate. Whip it up tonight to ward off any bad luck, or make it this weekend for the simple sake of your health. Check out the recipe here, and may good luck be with you.